Giclee (archival) Prints

Diana Magnuson in a Tree

Diana Magnuson is an illustrator of 95 children’s books, art instructor and designer with CTI projects over 15 years, art tutoring with at-risk youth from Marquette County’s Juvenile Court and Great Lakes Recovery Center, past associate professor (Drawing and Illustration) at NMU.

www.dianamagnuson.com


“GISHEEK: SPIRIT OF THE CEDAR”

Gisheek is the Ojibwe word for the Northern White Cedar Tree

Archival, Giclee print

Gisheek: Spirit of the Cedar
© Diana Magnuson, Dancing Stones Productions

Image Size: 7 3/16” x 10 3/16”, with single mat: 11 x 14”
Enclosed in plastic envelope.
Please allow 3-10 days for delivery.

FOR A DONATION OF $100 ($40 Deductible) to the ongoing work of the non-profit Cedar Tree Institute, GISHEEK: SPIRIT OF THE CEDAR © Diana Magnuson will be mailed to you as a sign of our appreciation.





Credit Cards Accepted

PRINT ONLY, NO DONATION: $60





Credit Cards Accepted

Additional print information:

ANISHINAABE CLAN SYSTEM

The Anishinaabe base their system of kinship on patrilineal clans. The clans, based on animals, are instrumental in traditional occupations, inter-tribal relations, and marriages. A few of the animals representing each system are:

Moozwaanowe clan: Scouting, Hunting & Gathering: Shown: Waawaashkeshi (Deer) and Waabizheshi (Marten) are two of the nine animals.
Wawaaxisii clan: Charged with Teaching and Healing: Shown: Googoonh (Fish) and Mishiikenh (Turtle) two of 17 animals.
Nooke clan: Defense and Healing: Makwa (Bear) one of three animals.
Baswenaazhi clan: Outgoing International Communications: Ajijaak (Crane) one of eight animals.
Aan’aawenh clan: Internal/Domestic communications: Aan’aawenh (Pintail), Owewe (Wild Goose) two of 15 animals.


“ISLE ROYALE, AN ISLAND IN TIME”

Archival, Giclee print

Isle Royale
© Diana Magnuson, Dancing Stones Productions

Image Size: 12” x 14.5”, with single mat: 16″ x 20″
Enclosed in plastic envelope.
Please allow three-ten days for delivery.

FOR A DONATION OF $200 ($120 Deductible) to the ongoing work of the non-profit Cedar Tree Institute, ISLE ROYALE, © Diana Magnuson will be mailed to you as a sign of our appreciation.





Credit Cards Accepted

PRINT ONLY, NO DONATION: $80





Credit Cards Accepted

ISLE ROYALE, AN ISLAND IN TIME

Isle Royale is isolated in Lake Superior, the second largest body of fresh water in the world. The 210 square mile island is rocky and swampy and not conducive to human habitation. Yet, man has hunted, fished and mined on Isle Royale for thousands of years. In 1940 the island and the surrounding archipelago was declared a National Park. Since that time, the isolation of Isle Royale has permitted a natural biological laboratory to develop for the study of the single prey/single predator relationship of moose and wolf. Today, the balance between natural science research and wilderness recreation is a well-established and healthy one.

Isle Royale was formed over 500 million years ago during the pre Cambrian era by basaltic lava welling out of fissures in what was then an ocean floor. From the air, a pattern of parallel ridges of basalt, alternating with sedimentary rock, is visible. The most recent ice age accentuated this pattern and scooped out small lakes in the bedrock. Between the ridges, where water accumulates, the land is boggy. Much of the white pine forests, which covered most of the island, were logged and burned by miners and naturally occurring forest fires in the 1800’s and early 1900’s. These areas now show the re-growth progression of spruce, balsam, birch, and aspen. In areas of the island protected from the lake winds and untouched by miners, sugar maple and yellow birch grow. Isle Royale is also home to 31 species of orchids and a variety of colorful lichen.

– from writing by Retha Weiss


“MA’AINGEN, (THE WOLF) OUR BROTHER”

“We see the wolf as a predictor of our future. And what happens to the wolf happens to Anishinaabe …whether other people see it or not, the same will happen to them…” –Joe Rose, Bad River Ojibwe Elder

Archival, Giclee print

MA’AINGEN
© Diana Magnuson, Dancing Stones Productions

Image Size: 7 3/16” x 10 3/16”, with single mat: 11 x 14”
Enclosed in plastic envelope.
Please allow 3-10 days for delivery.

FOR A DONATION OF $100 ($40 Deductible) to the ongoing work of the non-profit Cedar Tree Institute, “MA’IINGAN (THE WOLF) OUR BROTHER,” © Diana Magnuson, will be mailed to you as a sign of our appreciation.





Credit Cards Accepted

PRINT ONLY, NO DONATION: $60





Credit Cards Accepted

Additional print information:

MA’AINGEN, (THE WOLF) OUR BROTHER

The gray wolf has a special role in the cultural tradition of the Anishinaabe peoples of the Great Lakes Basin.  According to the Ojibwe creation story, the Creator sent original man the Ma’iingan (Ojibwe name for the wolf) to be special companion.  They traveled together naming all the plants, animals and places on earth.  When they finished, the Creator instructed them to walk separate paths, telling them that are forever linked to one another. What happens to Ma’iingan will happen to the Anishinaabe.

Between 2004 and 2009 Federal and Michigan law listed the wolf as an endangered species. In 2013 the designation was dropped.  Members of the twelve Federally recognized tribes of Michigan have taken a united stand to protect the wolf and keep the sanctity of the gray wolf in their cultural tradition.